The Coolest And Strangest Music Instruments

We will present to you the coolest, but also the strangest music instruments ever. You will able to see the art of sound or sound influence on different things. Sit back and enjoy.

Laser Harp

The laser harp is a musical instrument made of light. A fan of beams shoots up from the floor into the night sky. The performer can create music by placing their hands in the beams. Not only does “breaking” the beam produce notes, but sliding the hand along the beam will also change the sound.

The harp does not produce any sound by itself, but creates MIDI data that can be connected to any modern synthesizer.

The laser harp concept was invented by Bernard Szajner and used extensively by Jean-Michel Jarre, and more recently Little Boots.

Music inspired by Nikola Tesla

A mix of extreme high voltage and tunes, does a project get any better! Steve Conner has posted his ultra cool visual instrument on 4HV.ORG. Note the second video was listed by EastVoltResearch and can be seen on this site.

“I finally gave in and decided to post footage of me testing my OMG super secret musical DRSSTC. I designed it last year as a paid commission for a Danish arts group who wanted a chorus of six musical coils that could be played by MIDI. I made a single prototype to test it here, but they ran six coils together in the final system, built by Finn Hammer over in Denmark.
What I made was an adaptor board that connected the internal tone generators on a Roland JX-8P synth to one or more DRSSTCs. The board converted the volume envelope to burst length, so the harder you pounded the keys, the bigger the sparks got. Hitting a high pitched note hard would blow the fuses, and the MIDI arrangements had to take this into account.” Via Makezine

Glass harmonica

The glass harmonica, also known as the glass armonica, bowl organ, hydrocrystalophone, or simply the armonica (derived from “harmonia,” the Greek word for harmony), is a type of musical instrument that uses a series of glass bowls or goblets graduated in size to produce musical tones by means of friction (instruments of this type are known as friction idiophones).

Because its sounding portion is made of glass, the glass harmonica is a crystallophone. The phenomenon of rubbing a wet finger around the rim of a wine goblet to produce tones is documented back to Renaissance times; Galileo considered the phenomenon (in his Two New Sciences), as did Athanasius Kircher.
The Irish musician Richard Poekrich is typically credited as the first to play an instrument composed of glass vessels by rubbing his fingers around the rims. Beginning in the 1740s, he performed in London on a set of upright goblets filled with varying amounts of water. During the same decade, Christoph Willibald Gluck also attracted attention playing a similar instrument in England.

Water Bottle Membranophone

This is an instrument much like a saxophone but made of a water bottle and a paper tube. You can see and download instructions of playing this instrument on Exploratorium.

Theremin

This is one of the coolest things a have ever seen. And its 80 years old. Amazing thing you must confess. The theremin is an early electronic musical instrument controlled without contact from the player. It is named after its Russian inventor, Professor Léon Theremin, who patented the device in 1928. The controlling section usually consists of two metal antennas which sense the position of the player’s hands and control oscillators for frequency with one hand, and amplitude (volume) with the other, so it can be played without being touched. The electric signals from the theremin are amplified and sent to a loudspeaker.

The theremin is associated with a very eerie sound, which has led to its use in movie soundtracks such as Miklos Rozsa’s for Spellbound and The Lost Weekend and Bernard Herrmann’s for The Day the Earth Stood Still and as the theme tune for the ITV drama Midsomer Murders. Theremins are also used in concert music (especially avant-garde and 20th- and 21st-century new music) and in popular music genres such as rock. Psychedelic Rock bands in particular, such as Hawkwind, have often used the theremin in their work.

The Art Of Sound

Table that ressonates with sound causing sand to form patterns that look almost liquid when they change form.

This is a display at a local science museum. The iron filings (the fuzzy stuff) is sticking to a array of electromagnets that are set to respond to different frequencies. When the music is played the filings dance.

Dancing Dust Iron Flakes move to sound at the Arizona Science Center.

This device can see sound

…and you can make it for only 5$. This is a video a find out surfing the net, and it maybe not belong here, but on the other hand it does. Take a look how you can make a device to see sound. Great video, great thing. Enjoy.

Which instrument impressed you? If you now any other, fill free to leave a comment.

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